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Employment Law Archives

Are They Coming or Going? -- An Analysis of the Coming-And-Going Rule and How it Applies to Home Health Aides and Nurses

The question of whether the "coming-and-going" rule applies to home health aides and nurses during their travel to and from patients' homes is a complicated one. It is also a question that courts in Ohio have had a difficult time answering.

Supreme Court Decides Religious Discrimination in Employment Case

An employer cannot refuse to hire an individual because of a religious practice that the employer could reasonably accommodate without hardship. In EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., the Supreme Court addressed the issue of whether an employer must have actual knowledge of the need for an accommodation.

NLRB Supports Obscene Facebook Vulgarity, Punishes Common Sense Response

The National Labor Relations Board's decision in Pier Sixty, LLC, 362 NLRB 59 (2015), will be startling to many managers struggling to maintain civility in the workplace. Increasingly, supervisors and human resource departments are expected to behave like lawyers and to ignore common sense for what should be routine discipline decisions.

EEOC Making It More Difficult To Consider An Applicant's Criminal History

Stephen M. McHugh and C. Mark Kingseed, Coolidge attorneys and DBA Committee Members, co-authored an article for the May 2015 edition of the Dayton Bar Association's magazine, Dayton Bar Briefs, entitled "EEOC Making It More Difficult To Consider An Applicant's Criminal History."  Click to view the article. EEOC Making it Difficult to Consider Criminal History.pdf

Supreme Court Upholds DOL Authority to Determine Employee Status

On March 9, 2015, the United States Supreme Court issued a significant decision impacting employers who are concerned with whether or not their workers can be classified as exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The decision in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Assn. confirmed that the DOL had the ability to interpret its rules to determine that mortgage lenders were non-exempt employees. As such, mortgage lenders need to be paid overtime for every hour worked over forty per week.

Employee Background Checks: The Importance of Doing Them Right

Many of us know the name Edward Snowden. He is the Computer specialist accused of espionage and theft of government property. He allegedly revealed large-scale domestic spying efforts conducted by the United States and British governments. As a former contractor with access to highly sensitive information, his actions caused international scandal, a manhunt, and general animosity toward the United States and its secret, sanctioned invasion of the rights of its citizens.

Failure to Provide COBRA Notice Results in Penalties Even When Employer Pays the Bills

Regina Honey was pregnant with her second child and experiencing pre-term labor. Her doctor ordered bed rest for about two weeks. When Ms. Honey was ready to return to work at Dignity Health, she was told her employment was terminated. About two months later she was reinstated. However, the pre-term labor returned and her doctor ordered bed rest for the remainder of the pregnancy. Ms. Honey remained on bed rest until her son was born in July 2010.

Recent Ruling May Allow for Unionization Among NCAA Athletes

The board of directors of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has granted the largest college athletic programs in the country with partial autonomy. The move, approved by the board in a 16-2 vote, could allow members of the NCAA's five wealthiest conferences to provide benefits to student-athletes beyond scholarships and increased health care coverage.

NLRB Decisions Invalidated by Supreme Court

In Noel Canning v. NLRB, the Supreme Court issued a labor law decision most surprising because of its unanimity. The Supreme Court held on June 26, 2014, that President Obama's controversial January 2012 appointments of three members to the National Labor Relations Board (Sharon Block, Terence F. Flynn, and Richard Griffin) were invalid exercises of his office under the Constitution. The NLRB in that case had ruled against an employer in an unfair labor practice charge. The employer appealed, asserting that because three of the nation's five Board members had been placed on the Board by the President as "recess appointments" during a time when the Senate was not actually in recess, the Board lacked authority to issue any ruling at all.